Harvest Celebration #november #poetry #harvest

 

 all the machinery is oiled

 tucked away for another year

hands are chapped and stained

jeans are beyond repair

long lines of  jars

are waiting for papa

to put away

*

the air is filled with spice

and the kids are keen

tonight we bundle up

jars of corn,potatoes, and beans

 given as an offering

thrown into a  pot

 we hunker down with a cup

*

tear off some bread

cross-legged on the ground

some laugh others holler

the tractor pulls around

“come on kids time for a spin”

young and old

jump on the hay hauler

*

moonlight graces the fields

smiles on the hard work

and for another year

is pleased with our effort

the bonfire no longer shy

limbs and cornstalk fuel

meeting the night starry clear

*

sparks seem to fly

dessert cooks on the end of a stick

marshmallows with chocolate the best

children’s gooey  hands they lick

we look into year-end embers

packing up our memories

&  bid “goodbye” to another harvest

bonfire

 This weeks Poets United Midweek Motif celebrated the Bonfire. So whether its inspired by Guy Fawkes or a successful harvest gather round the fire.

Last year’s Harvest offering.

The Crow #haiku #poetry

kare eda ni karasu no tomarikeri aki no kure

on a bare branch
a crow has stopped
autumn dusk

~Basho

your cries fill the sky

leaves shudder from the chill

red and gold bonfires

fire

The bird that best represents autumn is the Crow today’s Carpe Diem prompt.

The Harvest Celebration #haiku #tanrenga #poetry

Here is our first Tan Renga starting haiku written by Jessica of Like an Apple; Jessica wrote this haiku in response on our kigo ‘scarecrow’ (Kakashi).

Stanza 1 (5-7-5) ~ Jessica
wind jostles the scarecrow
near the heavy-hung cornstalks
the summer is spent

Stanza 2 (7-7) ~ me 

lonely in the cold of day

bonfires to warm the dance tonight

Even scarecrows need to have some harvest celebration!

Celebrate with us at Carpe Diem as we spend the month writing Tan Renga.  Tan Renga is a short-linked poem (written by two poets) which has two stanzas. The first stanza has 5-7-5 syllables and the second stanza has 7-7 syllables. The second stanza is a response to the first and has to have a ‘kind of link’ with the first stanza, I call that link an echo of the first stanza. Try your hand at Tan Renga.

Celebrate the Harvest Moon (Meigetsu) #haiku #poetry

Bonfire

golden face glow

life stirs beneath your smile

ready for harvest

*

celebrate harvest

kids laughter in hay wagon

stew on the fire

*

We lived in an agricultural area for years.

How fun to celebrate the end of harvest by a bonfire of cornstalks and walnut limbs while the kids went on a moonlight ride.

Celebrate the Harvest Moon (Meigetsu) courtesy of Carpe Diem

Thanks to Briarcroft for the photo of the bonfire 

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